Workshops

Detailed outlines and results from the Community Solar on State workshop series.

Core Meeting

When:  May, 9 2014.

Attendees: 

John Boecker

Jeffrey Brownson

Rob Cooper

Tom Keiter

Sarah Klinetob Lowe

Mike Prinkey

Mark Wherley

Alex Wiker

Core Meeting - Purpose

Goal 1:

One of the goals of today’s meeting is to slow down the flow and carefully re-craft the Meeting Purpose.

To align the project core team around the purpose, outcomes, and process fordeveloping a community-sourced PV system Workshop aimed at installing solarfarming as a learning lab at Penn State,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative co-creative process,

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in thisparticular community indefinitely.

Goal 2:

Today we will plan for the workshop and how to present the project to the public in such a way that the public will take ownership of the project. Looking at the project statement, we need to be sure that all three parts are focused on what we need.
 
  • We need to align community sourced with the community’s goal
  • Why does the document have no timeline?
  • We need to focus on the workshop
  • We need to plan out the entire arc of the project

While planning the project, we need to do our best to keep as many of the frameworks in mind at all times

Core Meeting - Agenda

 Introduction

The discussion was began  the fact that the project is more than simply installing PV array at Penn State. Currentconditions in the industry and public opinion show improved possibility of success compared to five years ago. Recentmeetings with COG indicate that there is a lot of local interest in PV. It is indicated that we need to be ware of negativereactions (resistance) from some local groups/people. Then, it is asked to hold off on discussing resistance until later.

Exercise 1 (Opening Exercise)

Relaxation exercise with three questions;

  1. Why are you here?
  2. What is the single most work-related potential that you bring to this project,
  3. What is the single most work-related problem that you see in this project?

Consider how you went about answering the second and third question.

Responses:

Potentials:
  1.  ​It will be difficult to manage moving this project forward
  2. The challenge is in motivating. Jeffrey sees a need for a strong sense of place and building a sense ofownership
  3. To solve problems
  4. To make a difference.
  5. Installing a PV array is a symbol of community spirit not just a step by step process of. Looking forward to learning about the dynamics within the community. 
Problems: 
  1. A building sense of panic trying to balance the Work/time challenges
  2. The challenge of changing upper level people’s willingness to change what the status quo. How do we build a sense of pride?
  3. This is a big challenge that makes me nervous. I need to break the task into smaller pieces.
  4. Finding a sense of place while changing jobs from jet engine engineer to volunteer work….scary
  5. Doesn’t feel knowledgeable about the technical end.

Additionally, there was a discussion about equating PV to a keystone species like the wolf. Introducing a wolf into an environment will forever change that environment. Introducing PV will change the technological environment at PSU.

Exercise 2

 Think of a meaningful project that was fulfilling and a meaningful project that was agonizing, andwhat made each project different?

Responses:

Fulfillings:

 

  1. Shared values and working well within a group.
  2. 2009 Solar Decathlon was an excellent group with a shared vision. Project had a slow start but very productive in the end. It had a sense of a co-created project.
  3. Working within a group with the goal of reducing PSU greenhouse gas emissions. 
Agonizings:
  1. Driving a project by himself. 
  2. The 2017 Solar Decathlon. Command and Control method of assigning tasks resulted in tension and no shared vision.
  3. The pushback from the community about changing from coal to natural gas was unexpected. Several years of planning with lots of progress and then..

 

FRAMEWORK  #1  Levels of Thought

Step 1

Belief

Philopsy

Principles

Step 2

Concepts

Strategies

Design

Step 3

Test/Implement

Audit

Evaluate

 

Part of Rob’s problem arose because the public entered the process in stage 2 and some of them felt that they were not involved in the early stages of the process.

Alignment is important – We need to bring the public into the process as early as is reasonable.

Discussion about  North Dakota decided to build a community health center. The project worked well because the “community” decided to build the health center. Even though a significant percentage of the population were not originally from the town, everyone had become community members.

Three Lines of Work (Carol Sanford)

Value Adding Process (Charlie Krones)

System Management (Charlie Krones)

The human body works because the system works together. A liver on its own is useless. Similarly, a high performance building in a poor system is useless.The system brings value to the group and the group brings value to the individual.

 

In Nature, resistance in water flow allows the water to take up nutrients that in turn feed the fish that can eventually feed us. (Resistance or slowing is important.)
 
Looking at a tree as the same system, the strength of the tree is not just the trunk, it is the roots and the leaves at the extremes.
Being aware of all of these frameworks will lead to a better understanding the cosmology of the entire Solar on State project.
 

Breakout Groups – Exercise 1:  

 What is unique about this place?
 
Physical: Trees, ridge and valley, cloud cover, island in a field, education, Happy Valley resilience, mild weather,

low bug count.
 
People: Core/Shell community structure, outdoor recreation, PSU farming core, big sports in a small town, age –youth and energy.
 
Other: Alumni mass -‐‐ the potential to spread the solar initiative, Lunar Lion – PSU flag on the moon, PSU -‐‐ Pride! 
 
Regroup: How does the uniqueness of State College fit into the “Story of Place “framework?
  1. Core Processes - What are the core processes that make State College what it is? (geology, physiology, hydrology, flora, fauna.)
  2. Core Purpose
  3. Core Values – Value adding processes

The core processes, purpose, and values all help get to the essence of a place.

  • State College has physical/geological barriers that isolate it from other communities and yet we always have an influx of new lifeblood (students).
  • State College has shown that it is a resilient town.
  • State College has a large potential to generate spread through the sheer mass of the alumni.

How does this exercise facilitate Solar on State? The people of Happy Valley show a strong connection to place and Penn State has a huge alumni presence. We should be able to tap into both. 

Breakout Groups - Exercise 2  

  1. What is the single effect we want this project to manifest?
  2. What are the risks? 
Positives Negatives
  • Build a culture of solar farming
  • Export a solar culture
  • Build PSU solar expertise
  • Replicate the viability of concept
  • Link to “Global Warming”
  • Risk if roof mounted system
  • The valley between will and fiscal responsibility

 We should be less focused on details and more focused on the generalities of the effects and risks, things vs. processes.

Positive:
We want to provide solar accessibility to everyone (a thing)
  • Create an promotional opportunity for PSU
  • Town and Gown collaboration
  • Community sourced project
  • Culture of solar farming (or harvesting) {PA is just 15% below the solar capacity of the SW states}

Negative:

We need to be careful with our choice of words.

  •  Is “culture” the proper word? Does “culture” have a negative connotation, as in…you want to change my culture?
  •  Storm water vs. rain water.
  • Do we use photovoltaic or solar farming? We are not trying to replace farmland with PV.
  • Is there a risk of naysayers associating this project with Global Warming?
  • Should this project be one large facility or multiple rooftop installations?  - A rooftop installation typically only captures 30% of a buildings needs.
  • PSUs current carbon reduction plan is focused on conservation.
  • Does the Solar on State project put PSUs financial future at risk or does solar become a value added opportunity.

How do we deliver value added processes to PSU and ALL stakeholders?

Key Stakeholders Framework -Pentad:

 

Our task is to define who the stakeholders are and where do they fit into the pentad. (Note: In our pentad, the earth systems do not have a voice.)

In business we focus on the return on investment (ROI)

#1 responsibility is the investor.

#2 responsibility is the customer.

Breakout Groups – Exercise 3: 

Identify one or two value added processes for each entity in order to help the system grow. How do we build up the whole system so that no one can afford to lose the project? We need to focus on building relationships between each of the entities.

A. Customers -(residents, PSU)

Create a solar farm that enriches the area in a way that makes the land fertile, town viable, and the University thrive.

B. Community- (residents, students, property owners, visitors) Cultivate a sense of ownership of energy flow that builds community pride, local stability, growth,

advancement, viability, and vitality.



C. Co-creators - (employees, installation crew, project managers, OPP, research students)Create a means by which they can grow and develop careers, skill sets, businesses, and economic viability.

D. Investors -(PSU)Enrich the memory of Happy Valley as the best place on earth to nurture the future.

We need to ensure that each stakeholder derives value from and continue to contribute to the project.

We need to ensure that each stakeholder derives value from and continue to contribute to the project.

Core Meeting - Output

Outcomes of the Meeting

Develop principles for value added project:



 “Come align around defining the purpose of this project.”

Note: We are running a little behind on tome so we will have to have am phone call later where we define the outcomes…

Project Function Statement:  

To develop a community-created place-sourced photovoltaic generated utility source.”

Revised to…

“To develop a community-created PV-generated energy source in Happy Valley.”



Principles:
  1. Integrate Town-Gown collaborative participation and co-collaboration.
  2. Discover and support the best and most effective locations for PV components.
  3. Develop and support community and University champions and advocates indefinitely.
  4. Develop nurturing (love-based not fear-based) decision making strategies.

Stakeholders

  • Who needs to be present and who do we invite?  The people who can make this happen and people who can make this stop.
  • State College public works (director/manager)
  • College Township public works (director/manager)
  • PSU VP of finance (or representative)
  • Solar on State core team (us)
  • PSU Sustainability Institute (David Riley and Denise W.)
  • Solar Campus Initiative (Chrei Olf?)
  • Community Energy Inc. representative
  • First Energy (West Penn Power) representative
  • Local Banks
  • PSFCU
  • Local municipality representatives (elected officials)
  • PSU office of investment (Dave Brannigan)
  • Community barriers (Joanne Swart?, David Stone, Mike Rebacki, Katherine Watt)
  • Community supporters
  • Student groups
  1. Sustainability Advisory Council
  2. Sustainability Institute interns
  3. Community and Economic Development
  • PSU attorney(s)
  • PSU alumni association representatives
  • Local school district
  • Business community (real estate, installation firms)

Next Steps:

The following items need to be finalized.

  1. What is the right number of people for the workshop?       Invite 100 expecting 60 to attend
  2. Where should the workshop be held?                                Local school – Park Forest Elementary
  3. When should the workshop take place?                             Late August? – Hopefully a late August workshop will allow most interested people a chance to attend.
  4. Identify ALL attendees.  Jeffrey will set up a Google Doc for us to populate with names, contact information, why, and entity.  The list should be vetted by Jeffrey and Rob.
  5. We need more calls to establish our intended public workshop outcomes and the public workshop process (agenda)
  6. Develop invitation from the value added processes.

Reflections

  • Anxiety level continues to increase – the project is getting bigger and bigger.
  • The procurement process at PSU is very complicated and we have a lot of unknowns.
  • We are gathering of the right people to move this project forward. We obviously have the intent and guidance that moves beyond merely splattering paint and hoping for the best.
  • A thought from his yoga instructor… let go of control and your body will do what it needs to do.
  • If the project moves off campus, he cannot fulfill his job responsibility of reducing PSUs carbon footprint.

Revised Purpose Statement

To develop a community-created PV-generated energy source in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative transparent co-creative process,

So that all of the stakeholders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Pre-Workshop Planning

Overview

 

From May 2014 to August 2014 the core team of planners convened for one eight-hour in-person work session and four 1-2 hour phone calls to plan the CSOS Workshop #1.

During the pre-workshop planning participants engaged in the same task cycle framework and integrative process that was utilized for the CSOS Workshop #1 and which is intended as the larger, framework and process for the integrative design Community Solar on State Initiative.  The graphics below show the basic task cycle components - purpose, products, and process – and the relatedness of each component of the planning, workshop, and overall initiative.

Dynamic Integrative Process Task Cycle Framework

 

Fractal Diagram showing the relatedness of each component of the CSOS Initiative

 

Below shows the progression of purpose statements for each phase thus far of the project.  Each purpose statement is structured to include a functional component (To), a being component (In a way that), and a will component (So that).



Purpose Statement for at the end ofthe Pre-Workshop In-Person Work Session 

Developed by by Jeffrey Brownson, John Boecker, Rob Cooper, Susan Stewart, Tom Keiter, Sarah Klinetob, Mike Prinkey, Mark Wherley, and Alex WikerJeffrey Brownson and John Boecker

To develop a community-created PV-generated energy source in Happy Valley,

Goal . . . what . . . Function

In a way that

Process . . . how . . . Being deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative transparent co-creative process,

So that all of the stakeholders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Qualifier- ultimate goal, purpose, outcome . . . why . . . Will



Purpose Statement for entering the CSOS Workshop #1

Developed by Jeffrey Brownson, John Boecker, Rob Cooper, Susan Stewart, Tom Keiter, Sarah Klinetob, Mike Prinkey, Mark Wherley, and Alex Wiker

To initiate the development of community-created PV-generated energy sources in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co-creative process

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.



DRAFT Purpose Statement for the CSOS Initiative

Developed collectively by 50+ community stakeholder attendees following the CSOS Workshop #1

To develop a community-created solar photovoltaic array in Happy Valley,

    

In a way that evolves transparently, enhances living systems, and values the voices of the community (both individual and collective),

So that future local energy projects embed energy resilience as a cultural value that enhances the quality of life in our region and empowers imaginations in this community indefinitely.

 

During the planning session the following products/outcomes emerged for the CSOS Workshop #1

  1.  Shared Principles
  2. Products/Outcomes for the CSOS Workshop #1
  3.  Process/Agenda for the CSOS Workshop #1
1.Shared Principles

The core team aligned around the following principles to hold during the CSOS Workshop #1

  • Discovering, not telling
  • Complete transparency
  • Allow the time and space for exploring potential without limiting ourselves to the restraints of current existing governmental and administrative structures
  • Embrace the value of “not knowing” in the discovery process
2. Products/Outcomes for the August Workshop

Functional

  •  Align around the Purpose and Scope of the Community Solar on State (CSOS) project
    • Understand the project’s distinctiveness and its “place-sourced uniqueness”
    • Explore potential methods for developing community PV at Penn State
  • Identify and align around the roles of all five key stakeholder groups (users/co-creators/earth systems/community/investors)
    • Develop a deeper understanding of the community’s the role in generating community-created, PV-generated energy sources and their potential
  • Develop Principles for delivering value-adding processes (VAPs) in balance to each key stakeholder group
  • Sketch an arc of a process for developing the CSOS project

Being

  • Experience co-exploration and collective discovery as co-creators in a collaborative process
  • Thinking grounded in place-sourced potential, pride, and hope

Will

  • Develop community leaders and vocal advocates who know why they are involved and are excited about their role
  • Build reciprocal mutually-beneficial interconnections between the University and the surrounding community
3. Process/Agenda for the Workshop

 

 

Workshop 1

 

When : 23 August 2014

Where: Park Forest Elementary School

Attendees:  The workshop hosted more than fifty community members from various community groups, including, but not limited to:

  • Staff and elected officials from the Borough, Townships, and the Centre Region Council of Governments (CRCOG)
  • Representatives from CITY-GREEN, a local grassroots organization for community energy conservation and renewable energy
  • Community group members from local businesses and schools (SCASD, non-profits, etc.)
  • Penn State administrators, faculty, students, and staff from multiple PSU departments (Earth and Mineral Science, Sustainability Institute, Office of Physical Plant, etc.)

Workshop 1 - Purpose

 

To initiate the development of community-created PV-generated energy sources in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co-creative process

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Workshop 1 - Agenda

1.Opening exercises and questions

  • Open with Context Questions
    • Experience aligning around Purpose - Review Workshop Purpose & discussion
  • Reflections

 

2.Project Distinctivenes

  • Break-out groups to identify what we really care about in our community & work with CSOS
    • Identify place-sourced potential – what is unique and special about this place?
  • Group discussion
  • Identify how the potential of CSOS is distinct from and related to other similar efforts

3. Explore Potential . . . and the difference between solving problems and shifting to realizing potential

  • Image: what single greatest affect do I want to make manifest through this project?
  • What are the risks (resisting forces)?
  • Identify reconciling forces

 

4.  Introduce Key Stakeholders Framework (pentad) and Value-Adding Processes (VAPs)

  • Large group reflections on and alignment around sets of core stakeholders
  • Introduce Living System framework (pentad)
  • Assign Break-out group work (to identify first iteration of VAPs for core stakeholders)

 

5. Identify Key Stakeholders and potential value-adding processes (VAPs)

  • Break-out group work to identify first iteration of 1 or 2 VAPs for five sets of core stakeholders
    • Work on VAPs that benefit each – each group focus on one sets of stakeholders
  • Large group reflections: alignment around VAPs for core stakeholder groups

 

6. Develop and align around Principles

  • Reconfigured break-out groups work on 1 or 2 Principles for delivering VAPs
    • Each group focus on one stakeholder group but balancing synergies with other four
  • Large group reflections on and alignment around Principles

 

7. Develop first iteration of Project Purpose

  • Break-out group work on Purpose Statement – Function, Being, Will
  • Identify key aspects from first iteration of project Purpose with large group

 

8. Discuss next steps

  • Develop arc of project schedule with key milestones
  • Identify primary roles and responsibilities

 

9. Reflections

10. Adjourn

 

 

 

Workshop 1 - Output

Opening exercises and questions

John Boecker (Facilitator: 7Group) kicked off the workshop by asking the question:

  1. “Think about an agonizing project you participated in in the past.”
  2. “Now, think of a project or experience you have personally had that, in your experience, was deeply fulfilling.”
  3. “What made the difference between these two images?”

Differences that emerged from this question were:

  • Good communication vs. bad/no communication
  • Command and control structures - Hierarchy made the decisions without team input
  • Collaboration vs. lack of collaboration
  • Not a true commitment or will to do the project in a certain way
  • Developing and realizing a collective purpose that meets the values of the business 
  • Collective trust among the varying organizations and team
  • Self-alignment with interests vs. determined requirements
  • Invitation to question assumptions vs. status quo
  • Less flexibility in how resources were allocated
  • Access to information
  • Clearly defined roles and responsibilities vs. ambiguity

Project Distinctiveness

Participants talked with others at their table about the question “What is unique and special about this particular place?”  Individual responses were then shared with the larger group:

  • Cultural and knowledge resources with Penn State
  • Education highly valued
  • Temperate climate: Four distinct seasons with high moisture content - no extremes
  • Family oriented
  • Access to outdoor activities and parks network
  • Ridge and valley informs/creates healthy soil and water, but Karst components
  • Complex political structure with intergovernmental, proactive cooperation
  • Insulated metropolitan center
  • Highly transient population with flow of new vitality
  • Potential influence on other communities
  • Great trout streams
  • Not economically diverse - Penn State + Agriculture ($4.5 billion annually), but recession-proof
  • Extremely low crime rate
  • Arbor Day Tree City: uniquely combined with technology and agriculture, highly valuing all three
  • Experienced collectively a major destabilizing event
  • Proactively risk adverse
  • Gentle rolling landscape: Farmland/forests/streams with iconic landmarks (Mt. Nittany)
  • Philanthropic spirit
  • Seasonal air quality changes - generally quite high
  • Live/work community
  • “Sunnier than Seattle”
  • International diversity within an insular location
  • Rooted families and transients

 

Explore Potential 

John asked each table to think about the activating forces through personally imaging the single greatest affect one would want to make manifest through this Community Solar on State project.  He then asked to think of the resisting forces or risks for this particular project.  Individual responses were then shared with the larger group.

Through this exercise, two frameworks were shared and elaborated on by the facilitator:

Law of Three Framework



This framework images the necessity of restraints to engage and develop creative outcomes through discovery of reconciling (or harmonizing) processes by focusing on Potential: (from Charles Krone)

 

Levels of Thought Framework

This framework images an instrument for developing an integrative process that significantly increases the likelihood that the resultant effects on the whole will align with our values when we take the time to align around our collective beliefs, philosophies, and principles before design.  (from Carol Sanford)

Beliefs                               Belief -- How we believe “things work”

Philosophies                      Philosophy -- Our approach

Principles                           Principles -- Guides to action

-------------------

Concept

Strategies

Design

------------------

Audit

Evaluate

Maintain

 

Most projects start somewhere in the middle section between strategies and design.  The fulfilling and agonizing parts of project generally come into play with alignment around purpose, trust, good communication, lack of command and control structure.  Without going into too much depth, this generally means that we are talking about aligning around beliefs, philosophies, and principles. 

What are our Activating Forces?
  • Cultivating trust and creative power in town/gown relationship
  • Energy independence
  • Demonstrate honest economic gain
  • Energy literacy
  • Tap and charge the “Peoplevoltaic” Energy ®
  • Shift mindset to think about energy resources like other infrastructure as local issues
  • Use this as a pilot to affect mainstream adoption and legislative change
  • An instrument for disseminating knowledge and experience with renewable energy beyond here (this community) … manifest outreach
  • Cultivate a culture of solar farming
  • Develop strong interrelationships/partners between community/education/government/utility/finance entities
  • See PVs as a small part of a larger system of integrative renewable energy sources
  • Enhance personal agency among our citizens in making this a better place … “Empowerment” … Building capacity and capability (regenerative)
  • Develop effective community connectness
  • Generate multi-generational outreach

 

What are our Resisting/Restraining Forces?
  • Need creative thinking about economics/financial solutions
  • Don’t see our role and will as effecting economics/resources
  • Need for communicating how to create new ownership models (or use existing that effectively leverage incentives)
  • Inertia of our current ostensible satisfaction (resistance to change - the perception that it ‘ain’t broke’)
  • Economic stake
  • Not just a demonstration
  • Overcoming fear and distrust from old wounds
  • Perception that this is a Penn State project without community participation, transparency, and vision
  • Understanding our active role(s) in participatory implementation
  • Current administrative/governmental structures/processes
  • Single industry “company town”

 

Key Stakeholders Framework (pentad) and Value-Adding Processes (VAPs)

John introduced the idea of the key stakeholders framework.  The idea behind it is that for an organization, institution, entity, or business to be sustained and evolve into greater levels of health, capability, and vitality over time, five stakeholder groups need to be served, and they are interrelated in the ways they also serve each other. (framework from Carol Sanford, The Responsible Business)



For any project, the number of stakeholders per category will vary (e.g. the number of local government groups involved in this particular project), and the stakeholders may also dynamically overlap (e.g. a Penn State employee may be a Co-Creator by day and a Community member by night).   It is important to identify every stakeholder as part of the project process and ensure value-adding processes are delivered to each identified group.



The Value-Adding Processes move beyond simply “value add”, which was interpreted as the outcome of Charlie Krone’s research, to be a dynamic and indefinite process of delivering value to each stakeholder.

Enter image and alt text here. No sizes!
Dynamic Value Adding Processes to Each Key Stakeholder
 
 

Develop and align around Principles

Workshop attendees were randomly assigned one of the five key stakeholders for small group work, regardless of which stakeholder group they most strongly identified with.  Each group then developed the following:

  1. Draft Definition of their stakeholder group
  2. Draft Principles
  3. Draft Value Adding Processes

The following organizes the draft definitions, and draft Value Adding Processes (VAPs) from each group.

Draft Definitions

 

Draft Principles

Draft VAPs

 

Transcriptions of Each Stakeholders’ Notes
1. Users

Draft Definitions

  • Users of End Power
  • Users of Learning
  • Users of Inspiration and Story

Draft Principle

  • Empower imaginations

Draft VAPs

  • Lifelong learning through multiple access points (web) to draw from and input best practices
  • Developing realistic belief in our capacity to enact sustained arcs of development as partnerships

2. Co-Creators

Draft Definitions

  • Citizens
  • Non-Governmental organizations
  • Government
  • Borough
  • Municipalities
  • Townships
  • County
  • Parks and Rec
  • Paid staff
  • Volunteers

From Summary Page #5

Must Have 

Building Capability To ...

1. Incentive

  •  Emotional
  • Financial
  • Research

2. Resources

  • Connections
  • Buy-in
  • Communication
  • Stick to it - tenacity
  • Materials/Tools
  • Knowledge
  • Access

Draft Principles (Co-Creators Group)

  • Active + Aware of objective listening
  • Engage and educate and motivate
  • Active collaboration → Work together to active collaborative group first vs. the first

Co-Creators Notes from Pages 1-4

Active Role

  • Human energy/ creativity
  • Give time, thoughts
  • Boots on the ground
  • Self chosen, others chosen
  • Ability to be wrong and learn
  • Establish structure
  • Community → Others, Continuity/stabilizing force
  • Creativity/Problem solver/Negotiator

Must have?

  • Time (Capacity)
  • Commitment
  • Empowerment
  • Determination, perseverance, drive + openness + listening
    • Evolution/engage with community
  • Knowledgeable 
  • Direction → Goal Vision
  • Inclusive → Everyone included
  • Listening, flexible, evolve - while maintaining mission
  • Active/birthing
  • Vision?
  • Will?

Incentives

  • One stop shopping
  • More than volunteer
    • Job
    • Sustainable
  • Framework for engagement
    • Respectful/open
    • Scheduling/predictability/respect for multiple competing objectives
  • Educate → Ups and downs, examples of things can do
  • Programs/milestones/measurable/acknowledgeable 
    • Metric
    • Way to access goal/involvement
  • Sense of satisfaction
  • Buy in
    • Authority
    • Engagement
    • (Protection) 
      • Must be brought in early belief
      • Listening
  • Cultivate(?) enthusiasm
  • Fairness
  • Respect
  • Accountability/Responsibility
    • Don’t drop the ball
  • Trustworthiness
    • Genuine:
      • Interest
      • Belief
      • Predictability
  • Viability
    • Value added
    • Live up to expectations
    • Build engagement/excited
  • Develop vision/mission together
    • Ownership
    • Buy-in
    • Collaboration: 
      • People working together for common end
      • Sharing/cooperating knowledge/info/resources/contacts (anything that benefits others)
      • Resource pool
  • Social → Play nice
    • Socially adept
  • Inquisitive/curious
    • Don’t get mad, get curious
    • Not taking things personally
    • See opportunity in difference
  • Active listening
  • Alignment vs. mismatch
    • Disconnect in hearing
    • Disconnect in experience
  • Consensus building
    • Work together

3. Earth Systems

Draft VAP

  • Positive net benefit (caring for Earth)

 

Draft Principles

  • Use true eco balance sheet
  • Extend eco-thinking to other situations

 

4. Community

Draft Purpose Statement



To indefinitely enhance the environment/habitat of those affected by the project (community)

In an integrative way that adds to culture, aesthetics, embraces changes, and openness

So that more people are positively impacted

Draft Principles

  • Continually fostering mutual healthy relationships
  • Respect and inclusion in decision-making processes (freedom of choice)
  • Consciousness of all stakeholders in decision-making

5. Investors

Net Metering

Tax Incentives

Transparency

    B corporations?

Who are investors?

  • First Energy

 

Benefits?

  • Emissions reductions
  • ROI …? %
  • Long term fixed rate electricity
  • Green energy
  • Mechanism to sell shares

**Formation of an entity of investors

  • Locally sourced

Draft Principles

  • Contributes to the local commonwealth
  • Investment improves public perception of power providers
  • Value in piloting project
  • Legal requirements …
  • Demonstrate value of community solar project
  • Make decisions that demonstrate connection between local environment and economy
  • B-corporation, measurable

 

Develop first iteration of Project Purpose

 

New groups were determined randomly to develop draft purpose statements for the CSOS project

Draft Purpose Statements

DRAFT Collective Purpose Statement Group #1 Group #2 Group #3 Group #4
To develop a community-created solar photovoltaic array in Happy Valley To develop a local community-created solar photovoltaic array as an instrument … To create a community-based PV system in Happy Valley To work collaboratively to create a visible and public energy that develops local PV projects To transition to a relocalized sustainable economy and culture (energy)
In a way that evolves transparently, enhances living systems, and values the voices of the community (both individual and collective), In a way that can be expanded locally, creates a “tool box” for new challenges, brings stakeholders together, and pushes us to regenerative potential over compromise, and respects lives in the environment In a way that is replicable and demonstrates value In a storied and imaginative way  In a way that people are empowered to individually and collectively create new projects
So that future local energy projects embed energy resilience as a cultural value that enhances the quality of life in our region and empowers imaginations in this community indefinitely So that energy resilience is embedded as a cultural value of the region, empowering imaginations So that all stakeholders enthusiastically foster energy independence and reduce reliance on fossil fuels/nuclear to enrich and improve the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely To further develop towards a healthy and transformative energy future here and elsewhere So that the quality of life is improved

 

 

Purpose Discussion

  • Evaluate/acknowledge other renewable energy systems (PV as “keystone species”) with high visibility as a catalyst in purpose statement (as a component of will)
  • PV as an instrument for engaging and generating whole system strategies

Next Steps

  • Workshop report
    • First iteration of project purpose
    • Products: VAPs for key stakeholders with guiding principles
    • Solicit feedback/input
  • Schedule Workshop #2
    • Develop place-sourced concept
    • Identify initial strategies
    • “Criteria for developers” RFP
  • Develop arc of key milestones 
    • Installed system by end of 2016
  • Develop, identify and expand attendees (see task cycle)
  • Explore alternatives and determine administrative/corporate structure for implementation 
    • Identify associated implications
  • Develop task cycle for workshop #2
    • Development what “concept” needs to include
    • Purpose
    • Products
    • Process
  •  Aim at clearly defining administrative “entity” in a transparent, inclusive way
  • Explore implications of grid-tied system

Workshop 2

 

When:  October 11th, 2014.

Where: Penn State University’s Kunkle Lounge. 

Attendees: The workshop hosted more than thirty community  members  from  various  community  groups,  almost  a  third  of  whom  were  Penn  State students.

 

Workshop 2 - Purpose

 

 

To develop and align around desired outcomes for a community-created PV array in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co-creative process,

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in developing the potential for future local energy projects and enriching the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Workshop 2 - Output

Opening exercises and questions

       Open with Context Questions by John Boecker.

                Experience aligning around Purpose Review Workshop Purpose & discussion

Question 1: “Have you ever walked into a meeting where you just knew something or some energy was not good, or good?" (Generalagreement from the attendees)

“Then do we agree that these energies are real?”

“Good/bad makes no difference  the important thing is to ask what is my role in creating the energy?”

Question 2: If he had permission to work on things that may “shift your thinking”.  He had attendees close their eyes, both feet on the floor, and after a deep breath consider the question: “How can work on this projectserve to develop that which I am working on in myself?

In thinking about this, John had attendees pay attention to the part of youwatching yourself.  He then asked:

Question 3: How did you feel?  Any shift?

Responses that emerged from this question were:

  1. This was a good moment to refocus and shift intent from all the business of the day back into the project.
  2. Nice to be consciously aware of the energies.  The awareness allows you to know they are real so you can change the energy
  3. Like a “reset button” that helps you think further down the road to make more beneficial long-term decisions for the communinty.

Align around project Purpose (generated at Workshop #1)

  • Review Principles for delivering value-adding processes (VAPs) in balanceto each key stakeholder group

John led the group in a review of the previous workshop, reviewing the different frameworks he presented.  First, the Levels of Thought framework: 

Beliefs

Philosophies

Principles

Concept

Strategies

Design

Audit

Evaluate

Maintain

 

Next, he reviewed the scoping of Purpose, Products, Process, Functioning Capabilitiesfor any project.

Followed by Framework ofthe Law of Three: 

 

Followed by the Framework of the Living Systems Pentad:

In examining the pentad, John asked everyone to consider:

  • What Value Adding Processes (VAPs)must be created to keep the systems alive
  • These VAPS must be delivered in balance.
  • We may all be part of multiple stakeholder groups
  • The Earth and Community processes are traditionally ignoredas stakeholders

 

On participant noted that the owner of a hugely successful Chinese company, Alibaba, had mentioned his emphasis on valuing Customers and Employees.

John then outlined how at the last workshop we had tried to develop VAPs so we could develop Principles that today we can develop Concepts and Outcomes at this workshop.  At this point he displayed the Project Purpose Statementthat the core group distilled from the four Purpose Statements developed at Workshop #



 

DRAFT Collective

Purpose Statement

Group #1 Group #2 Group #3 Group #4
To develop a community-created solar photovoltaic array in Happy Valley To develop a local community-created solar photovoltaic array as an instrument ... To create a community-based PV system in Happy Valley To work collaboratively to create a visible and public energy that develops local PV projects To transition to a relocalized sustainable economy and culture (energy)
In a way that evolves transparently, enhances living systems, and values the voices of the community (both individual and collective), In a way that can be expanded locally, creates a “tool box” for new challenges, brings stakeholders together, and pushes us to regenerative potential over compromise, and respects lives in the environment In a way thatis replicable and demonstrates value In a storied and imaginative way In a way thatpeople are empowered to individually and collectively create new projects
So that future local energy projects embed energy resilience as a cultural value that enhances the quality of life in our region and empowers imaginations in this community indefinitely So that energy resilienceis embedded as a cultural value of the region, empowering imaginations So that all stakeholders enthusiastically foster energy independence and reduce reliance on fossil fuels/nuclear to enrich and improve the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely To further develop towards a healthy and transformative energy future here and elsewhere So that the quality of life is improved

 

Revised Project Purpose Statement:

To develop a community-created solar photovoltaic arrayin Happy Valley,

In a way that evolves transparently, enhances living systems, and valuesthe voices of the community (both individual and collective),

So that future local energy projects embed energy resilience as a cultural value that enhances the quality of life in our regionand empowers imaginations in this community indefinitely.

John had Dr. Brownson read the Purpose Statement aloud; then he had everyone close their eyes while he read it aloud again asking the question: “What resonates in your thinking or feeling?”

Responses were as follows:

-Nothing resonated individually.  Rather it was the “gestalt of it”  it resonated as a whole system

This statement led John to bring up the Framework of Function, Being, Will:

 

 

Followedby theFramework of the Three Lines of Work:

Enter image and alt text here. No sizes!

 

The Purpose Statement for Workshop #2, noting that only the Function statement had changed from WS#1:

Workshop 2

To develop and align around desired outcomes for a community-created PV array in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co-creative process,

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in developing the potential for future local energy projects and enriching the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Workshop 1

 

To initiate the development of community-created PV-generated energy sources in Happy Valley,

In  a  way  that deeply  values  the  role  of  all  stakeholders  in  a  collaborative  and transparent co-creative process

So that all stake holders enthusiastically participate in enriching and improving the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

 

Presentation and discussion aimed at developing a deeper understanding of core content

  • Energy systems
  1. Supply and demand scenario integrated with ecosystems
  2. How community-generated PV systems work within this scenario (including examples)
  • Viable third-party structure options
  1. What does “community-generated PV” mean?
  2. 3 examples of options for shared solar business models

 

At this point, Dr. Brownson gave a presentation on Energy Systems and Viable Third-Party Structure Options:Dr. Brownson then asked the following Questions:

  1. “How might solar farming be like community gardening?”

With the following responses:

  • Process that grows health in a community
  • Off-grid serving the locality
  • Possible to have individuals have own “plots” of solar garden?
  • Food is not only value product (relationships, time, etc.)
  • Food gets you in the dirt, thinking about the seasons  how to make solar energy farming this way?

2. “How might community solar cultivation provide more than just power, as gardens provide more than just food?”

Exercise #1:  Develop first iteration of targeted outcomes for the project

  • Break-out group work to identify targeted outcomes that serve the vitality of 5 key subsystems:
  1. Habitat
  2. Water
  3. Energy
  4.  Material resources
  5. Economy

John gave a presentation on integrative design, explaining the connection between multiple subsystems: water, energy, habitat, materials, and budget.

Break-Out Session #1

Attendees divided into five groups (each group assigned a different subsystem) to develop one or two demonstrable and measurable Targeted Outcomes that serve the vitality of each of the subsystems.

Water

Water Outcomes Essentialized:
  1. Net improvement/healing of water cycle
  2. Improving learning and overall awareness of our local water-energy-food nexus
  3. Develop the VAPs that water can contribute to local systems
  • Rain cleans modules
  • Producing NG consumes water
  • PV materials→ consumes water (LCA)
  • Energy used to move water
  • Traditional generation consumes water

Educational Value

  • T.O.: elevated energy-water conservation (raising energy demand awareness)
  • T.O: net improvement to storm water cycling → higher use
  • T.O.: Seeking out VAP from water for PV integration (rain) (clouds)
  • T.O. Including and elevating water performance from PV system (metering reporting)

VAP of Water

  • Aesthetic and cultural
  • Grow food
  • Sustain life
  • Clean things
  • Entertainment
  • Energy storage/transfer
  • Ice
  • Industry process
  • Dilute toxins
  • Transporting goods
  • Transporting people, waterways

Habitat

Outcomes Essentialized:

  1. Visual representation of PV as cultural value
  2. Ecological and cultural assets
  3. Enhancement of natural communities
  • A visual representation of changing cultural values
  • Provides ecological and cultural assets, including educational opportunities for inhabitants
  • Exemplifies an organic relationship between the built and natural environment, including enhancement of the natural community’s integrity

Material Resources

Outcomes Essentialized:

  • Use a total accounting (downstream & upstream) of:
    • Efficient use of materials
    • Health & Environmental impact
    • Localization
    • Culture & aesthetics

Targeted Outcomes

  • What: Total Accounting (not necessarily of equal weight)
    • Efficient use of materials
      • Cost
      • Energy of production (net positive)
      • Land area
      • Raw materials
      • Design (tracking systems, etc.)
    • Consideration of Health impacts
      • Human + environment
      • Understand baseline impacts of status quo
      • Establish safety systems
    • Localization of materials
      • Local fabrication/installation
      • Locally sourced materials
      • Reduce transportation costs
      • Community involvement
      • Feasibility
      • Promote local interacting culture, activity
    • Culture and Aesthetics
      • Inspiration
      • Moral values
  • How:
    • Collect information on each material used
    • Make decisions based on baseline (total accounting versus status quo)

Energy

Outcomes Essentialized

  1. Health Benefits
  2. Social/Economic Benefit
  3. (Energy-related) Community Consciousness (Beyond cheap and available)

Economy

Outcomes Essentialized

  1. Competitive Pricing
  2. Legal Entity Established
  3. Location Confirmed

Large group discussion of results from Exercise #1

Attendees were asked to reflect on “How your role in this project is changing/developing?”

Responses:

  • Shifting from working frameworks to having frameworks work you  giving voice to frameworks
  • Increasing # of people developing skills, resources, and empowerment in moving these types of projects forward
    • Process itself is instrument for delivering VAPS
  • Shift from participating on faith and duty toward engaging will (as project becomes more concrete)
  • Don’t see engineers being responsible party.  Need to produce outcomes that allow us to measure impact on local cultural values
  • Language is emerging, becoming more careful, precise, intentional
  • Envisioning fun increasing, bringing friends, have to caution self with idyllic fantasy
  • Want to capture “story” (conversation, imagery) that can empower imaginations

Exercise #2:  Develop cross-pollinated targeted outcomes for the project

  • Break-out group work to identify second iteration of targeted (measurable) outcomes that emerge from integrative synergies between the 5 key subsystems

Break-out Session #2

Identify specific outcomes to deliver to each of the 5 stakeholders relative to each subsystem:

Water (grouped according to numbered outcomes from break-out #1)

Users

  1.  Empowering imaginations & well being
  2. Sustainable attitude – pollination across space & generations

Community

  1. Resilient potable, Accessible water
  2. Contributes to story of place – pride of “home”

Co-Creators

  1. Closing the loop, Offers profit opportunity
  2. Develop empowering skills

Investors

  1.  Create interest – risk/reliability (e.g., PV production insulated from drought)
  2. Better understanding of systemic risk & revenue

Earth Processes

  1. Nutrient rich – better ecosystem services,  Toxin poor
  2. Strengthens human link to earth systems

Habitat

  Visual Rep. of Cultural Values Ecol. & Cult. Assets Org. Rel.
Users Identifying w/ cultural values

Inspiring imagination
Gathering places

Integrating w/ ed. Ops.
Enables a local green energy choice
Community It is sunny here! Empowerment of the community Supporting objectives of municipalities

-    Obligation to natural comm.
Co-creators Alt. to football! Diverse collab. Group engaged in process

Sense of pride

Investors Linking econ. Health & env. Health

Local energy
Collateral investments Protecting natural env. → econ. implications
Earth Processes Distributed energy eff’s LCA offset by cultural value benefits Reduction of emissions

 

Economy

Users

  • Lower true cost of energy

Earth Systems

  • Lower carbon output
  • Dual purposing of land

Community

-Diminished impact from externalities

  • Generating reciprocal exchanges within and beyond the community

Investors

  • Return on investment

Co-Creators

  • Using locally sourced inputs allows local business to develop expertise

Materials

Earth

  • Minimize carbon footprint
  • Minimize habitat disturbance
  • Regenerate extracted resources

Users

  • Creating healthy use (for addicts)
    • We are Methadone
  • Energy security/stability

Community

  • Awareness of where project materials came from
  • Localization + culture + aesthetics
  • Maximize values embedded in materials

Investors

  • Increase health of local community
  • Improve connection with community
  • Increase # of investment opportunities

Co-Creators

  • Expanded vision of possibilities
  • Create jobs/expertise/capacity

Energy

  • Long- term Resilience of SE compared to volatility of fossil fuels
    • Cost to harvest
    • Supply/stability
    • Risk
      • Economic
      • Environmental
      • Job/employee safety
  • Greater individual and collective awareness
    • Quality
    • Relative energy impacts (environment)

Large group discussion of results from Exercise #2

Looking at all the 5 subsystems of targeted outcomes together, what are your impressions?

  • One system: can superimpose boards for each category
  • Weakness in how we communicate VAP to investors
    • So we need to set up appropriate investor structure

Exercise #3:  Break-out group work to explore issues associated with third-party options

  • Break-out group work to identify questions that need to be answered to adequately prepare for Concept development during Workshop #3

After break, the discussion looked at “What questions need to be answered to determine which third-party investment model should be used?”

First, the group discussed the Timeline:

  • The project needs to be under construction and connected by the end of 2016 – for tax reasons
  • Reinvention Fund ends at end of Dec. 2015 – can be extended

 

Flipchart Review of Questions/Topics that need answers

  • Unit cost implications for each model
  • Relative location constraints for each model
  • Who? Consider Public vs. Private entities re: model choice
  • What approach do we want to cultivate?
  • Options and capabilities of third-party entities
  • Skill development
  • What are the results/implications of PEDA grant?  (grant was not awarded to PSU)
  • Can we identify location options?
    • Greenfield?
    • Existing roofs?
    • Penn State land?
  • What are the options?:(Reciprocal mutually beneficial relationships)
    • Hosting entity
    • Financing entity
    • Operating entity
    • Ownership options
    • Driving entity
      • Passion
  • To develop a response to potential:
    • subscribers – carrying capacity
    • investment & threshold

Group discussion of results from Exercise #3

  • Identify roles and responsibilities for researching these questions to prepare for Workshop #3

 

Discuss next steps 

Develop arc of project schedule with key milestones and identify primary roles/responsibilities

Next Steps

  • Develop a process for identifying and communicating value to investors
  • Identify tasks to pursue after WS#3 aimed at interconnection by 12/31/2016

Preparation for WS#3

  • Process for disseminating results of 1st two workshops
    • Create a YouTube video narrating the story(?)
  • Need to invite experts --- word-of-mouth and direct invites best
  • Create a Stakeholder Analysis Task Force
    • New group to identify status/needs/prep time for WS#3
      • who, how, and what is constituting invites
      • stakeholder analysis
    • To establish date of 12/13 or January?
    • Core team (will start):
      • Sarah Klinetob-Lowe
      • Nari Soundarrajan
      • David Stone
      • Bill Sharp
      • Jeffrey Brownson
  • Develop Asset Map
    • Capabilities (e.g., PSU good buying power)
      • Power purchase agr
      • Construction
      • Solar power
      • Tax credits
      • Legal aspects
      • Third-party entities and what they can bring to the table
    • Identify potential level of commitment for each
    • Perhaps invite others in mid-Atlantic who have experience with shared solar to participate
    • Consider how to develop communication piece of this project

Reflections

“What are your reflections of your role in the project?”

  • Core membership growing
  • Should do a short communication piece
  • Realizing capacity within community to grow
  • Group developed capacity to tell each other they are “full of shit”

Adjourn

Workshop 2 - Agenda

 

  1. Welcome/Introduction – Jeffrey Brownson
  2. Opening exercises and questions
  3. Align around project Purpose (generated at Workshop #1)
  4. Presentation and discussion aimed at developing a deeper understanding of core content
  5. Break
  6. Exercise #1:  Develop first iteration of targeted outcomes for the project
  7. Pinup and lunch break
  8. Large group discussion of results from Exercise #1
  9. Exercise #2:  Develop cross-pollinated targeted outcomes for the project
    1. Break-out group work to identify second iteration of targeted (measurable) outcomes that emerge from integrative synergies between the 5 key subsystems
  10. Large group discussion of results from Exercise #2
    1. Looking at all the 5 subsystems of targeted outcomes together, what are your impressions?
      • One system: can superimpose boards for each category
      • Weakness in how we communicate VAP to investors
        • So we need to set up appropriate investor structure
        •  
  11. Break
  12. Exercise #3:  Break-out group work to explore issues associated with third-party options
    1. Break-out group work to identify questions that need to be answered to adequately prepare for Concept development during Workshop #3
  13. Group discussion of results from Exercise #3
    1. Identify roles and responsibilities for researching these questions to prepare for Workshop #3
  14. Discuss next steps 
    1. Develop arc of project schedule with key milestones and identify primary roles/responsibilities
  15. Reflections 
  16. Adjourn

 

 

 

Bridging Event

 

When: December 13th, Saturday

Where: Kunkle Lounge

 

Bridging Event - Purpose



To educate ourselves and explore possible entity choices, siting considerations, and timeline issues essential to a community-created PV array in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co- creative process,

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in developing the potential for future local energy projects and enriching the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Bridging Event - Agenda

1. Exploring: Entities, Siting, Timeline

  • Introduction and Welcome (Jeffrey Brownson and Sarah Klinetob Lowe)
  • Review of where we have been (WS1 + WS2) and where we need to go for WS3 
  • Entities and NREL models for Community Shared Solar 
  • Siting in our Community 

2. Break Out Sessions

3. Regroup and with Priorities and Tasks for WS3

4. Potluck lunch organized by Laura Dininni 

Bridging Event - Output

Workshop 3

 

When: 07 March 2015 

Workshop 3 - Purpose

 To develop a concept for the first of many Community Solar Projects in Happy Valley,

In a way that deeply values the role of all stakeholders in a collaborative and transparent co-creative process,

So that all stakeholders enthusiastically participate in developing the potential for future local energy projects and enriching the unique quality of life in this particular community indefinitely.

Workshop 3 - Agenda

Welcome/Introduction: Jeffrey Brownson

1.Opening     Exercises

  • Open with context questions

2. Review Workshop #1 and #2 results.

  •   Review project Purpose
  • Review Principles and for delivering value-adding processes (VAPs) to key stakeholder groups
  • Review targeted outcomes relative to five key subsystems

3. Align around Partnering Concept Framework diagram for CSOS Pilot project

  • Review outputs from bridging event
  •  Present Concept framework (from core team) for Pilot project Group discussion: Can this be altered to better achieve the Project Purpose?  

4. Develop Partnering Concept for CSOS Pilot project - Align around Off-taker and project site

  • Presentation: Why with PSU campus is likely best fit as site and OPP is likely best fit as Off-taker
  • Break-out Session #1: Identify how PSU campus-site and perhaps OPP as Off-taker (or other options) can serve to deliver VAPs to five stakeholder groups

 

5.Break – Pinup results of Breakout #1

6. Group discussion of results from Breakout #1

7. Design RFP process for selecting the Pilot project Developer

  •  Break-out Session #2: five groups, each focused on one of the following:
  •  Identify selection criteria (and constraints) for Pilot Developer
  • Identify potential Pilot Developers and outline timeline for selection process
  • Create Pilot RFP content outline (template) and process
  • How to incorporate delivering VAPs into a project-specific place-sourced RFP  
  • Explore means or structure for creating/tracking RECs for purchase fr/ public  

8. Lunch – Pinup results of Breakout #2

9. Group discussion of results from Breakout #2

  • Means of integrating results into first draft iteration of RFP
  • Develop arc of process (next steps) for creating Pilot RFP (Who, How, When)
  • Discuss options/advantages for other entities to serve as issuer of RFP to contact with Developer (perhaps a municipal entity, e.g., College Township)
  • Discuss any significant risks and opportunities associated with entering contract with Developer

10. Break    

11. Develop Community Entity (CE) to initiate future “Community Solar Cooperative”

  •  Breakout Session #3: five groups

Three groups focused on the following:  

  •   Identify roles/responsibilities of community-sourced participation – “Community Solar Cooperative” for Pilot and future projects  
  • Outline mechanism for managing feedback and future development  
  • Develop draft outline of future project “Tool Box” content (template RFP, draft land lease, draft Power Purchase agreement, etc.)  

Two groups – each focused on one of the following:  

  • Explore framework ideas (website?) for tracking development process and outcomes  
  • Identify means for developing Investors:  Clarify how community can access & accrue value from/invest in PV power (e.g., buy RECs) to finance the project  

12. Pinup and group discussion of results from Breakout #3

  •   Integrate results into broad roles of CE
  • Develop process for creating Pilot CE (Who, How, When)
  • Solicit volunteers willing to serve as community leaders as initial “Community Solar Cooperative” members

13. Discuss Next Steps

  •   Develop arc of project schedule with key milestones and identify primary roles/responsibilities

14. Reflections

15. Adjourn  

Workshop 3 - Output

Welcome and Introductions

John – What system are we trying to transform?    We are trying to transform the vitality of Happy Valley.

Enter image and alt text here. No sizes!
  • Developing us
  • To facilitate the group
  • To help the group transform the happy Valley area.

 

Think about a time when you have walked into a room where you can feel the positive energy. Keep that in mind.

What role do you have in this project? Gauge the energy in this room. Take into account what your goals are and the goals of the group. Let’s plan how to proceed to the final goal.

Opening Exercise

Relax, close your eyes and think about these three things.

  1. Imagine what a positive result will look like.
  2. How will it affect me if it works?
  3. What capability do I have to make it happen?

OK. What have you discovered about your role in this process?

Jeffrey – “My role is stronger when tied to the others in the group. My role is to provide 10 years of experience and bring his relationships in to help.”

Bill Sharp – It would be bad if this was actually the last meeting of this group. We as a group need to develop a vision to push this forward.  This is a pilot project and pilot projects are good.

Denise Wardrup – The idea of a pilot and to share the experience of the pilot is valuable. Pilots help to reduce fear of the unknown.

Xxxxxx? – This group has shown community, openness and transparency. This group helps build openness because we are dealing with a real project that concerns the community.

 

 

2015.03.07_003a.jpgJohn Boecker - 

This relates to the activating force / restraining force model. We are working to balance the two forces and move toward reconciling (up) not compromising (down).

 

 

2015.03.07_007a.jpgReview of Workshops #1

 

Most projects begin the planning process at the STRATEGY or DESIGN step but we have purposely decided to start the process by building BELIEF. Then we established PRINCIPLES and today we hope to build the CONCEPT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015.03.07_010a.jpg

Workshop #1 – Purpose

Workshop #2 – Products

Workshop #3 – Process

Moving forward to where we can move on to Preparation.

 

 

2015.03.07_012a.jpg

Jeffrey then read the Project Purpose aloud.

To develop a community-created solar PV array in Happy Valley.

                WHAT : FUNCTION

In a way that evolves transparently, enhances living systems, and values the voices of the community (both individual & collective).

                HOW : BEING

So that future local energy projects embed energy resilience as a cultural value that enhances quality of life in our region and empowers imaginations in this community indefinitely.

                WHY : WILL

We, as a group, are working to ensure that this is a community sourced project while keeping in mind that this pilot project does not need to be exclusively solar.

2015.03.07_012b.jpg

To develop…        =           What        -           Function     (F)

In a way that…     =           How           -          Being           (B)

So that…                =           Why          -           Will             (W)

 

We know that there will be restraining forces and that those forces are good. Restraining forces will help guide the future path of the project.

John B. then told us about his plan to begin having regular family breakfast dates. A date was set for the first family breakfast. On the morning of, John was super busy preparing for a conference call and was stressed out and the breakfast date was cancelled. Another date was set. Again, John was preparing for a conference call but was able to manage the stress level and the family had a wonderful breakfast.   John’s “being state” had to change between the two attempts. John was able to focus on the purpose of the family breakfast which was to build a stronger family.

What we are working on is to affect all future energy projects in the Happy Valley area.

Review of Workshops #2

 

2015.03.07_014a.jpgIn order for this project to be successful we need to make sure all five constituents buy in. We need to make sure we are delivering value added processes to ensure the buy in from the constituents.

We all have different roles in the pentad.

John B. – in 2005 Jonh was diagnosd with cancer at the beginning of the Christmas holiday break and had to wait for ten days before he was able to get any answers  about his situation. During those ten days, John decided he wanted to contribute to the world in a positive way.

We need to make sure we will deliver Value Added Processes (VAPs) that will support all of the key stakeholders. We also need to make sure we deliver the VAP in balance so no one stakeholder is out of balance.

 

 

 

During workshop #2 we developed about 30 VAPs . John boiled them down to the following few principles.

2015.03.07_016a.jpg

  1. Empowering imaginations
  2. Engaging active collaboration
  3. Deliver meaningful engagement and education
  4. Use true eco balance sheet
  5. Foster reciprocal inter-relationships
  6. Consider all stakeholders
  7. Contribute to local common-wealth
  8. Demonstrate value (connections between/ local environment & economy
  9. Align around clear and precise language

 

 

 

2015.03.07_018a.jpg

The final product of workshop #2 was the targeted outcomes (5 key subsystems)

  1. Habitat
  2. Water
  3. Energy
  4. Materials
  5. Economy

 

 

 

 

Align around Partnering Concept Framework diagram for CSOS Pilot project

 

Alex presented his notes from the December 13 bridging event which was held in the Kunkle lounge.

  1. Event Mission Statement
  2. Agenda Recap
  3. Internal Group Discussion
  4. Output  
  • Constraints: Timeline…
  • Considerations: Location…
  1. Next Steps
  • Develop asset map
  • What do we already have?
  • What do we still need?
  • How do we reconcile?

Discussion:

Wes Glebe – Attended a recent C.O.G. meeting and it became apparent to him that we need to build the right relationships with the proper groups in order to build traction for the project.

Develop Partnering Concept for CSOS Pilot project - Align around Off-taker and project site



Presentation: Why PSU campus is likely best fit as the site and OPP is the best fit as the off-taker.



Jeffrey presented his PowerPoint with notes from workshop #2.  

The second workshop led to a shift toward focusing on a pilot project to enable future local energy projects. This project should:

Skill development:

  • We lack the immediate skills to take on the entire project right now.
  • We need to find a project developer.
  • Transfer skills to the community

Site Development:

  • We need a site.
    • Is Penn State the best fit for off-taker?

Host:

  • We need an off-taker.
    • Who do we partner with?
      • Penn State? High School? Nittany Mall? UAJA?

                        Note: State High already has a $2 million grant for a good energy plan.

  • Is Penn State the best fit for siting? Penn State looks good because we have already established the groundwork and built a relationship.

Time limitations:

  • Must be done by end of 2016 to qualify for significant tax breaks.

 

Jeffrey’s reflection, all of this leads very well into the project plan. It looks the key points are that we are constrained by time and that Penn State might be the only real option for off-takers.

Rob Cooper presented his information about moving forward.

  • 2015.03.07_020a.jpgLong term – Steering organization to help drive future energy plans with a vision.
  • Off-taker - Needs to execute the PPA.
  • Contracting Entity – Needs to hire developer and write up RFP.
  • Developer – Builds, owns, operates, and finances the project
  • Community Based Investors – Involvement would be great.

Rob then followed with the following answers….

PSU can be the off-taker. PSU might be able to give the land on which the array can be built. PSU could be the contracting entity, but there may be better options out there.

Discussion:

Joe remarked that the steering committee has to keep the long term in mind, but should be flexible enough to make compromises to meet the short term goals.

DSC_9963a.jpgDSC_9964a.jpgBreakout Session #1:

 

  • Why is PSU the best site?
  • Why is PSU (OPP) the best off-taker?
  • How can PSU serve to deliver value added processes to all five stakeholder groups?



While making decisions in the breakout groups, keep in mind the five stakeholder groups and the eight (now nine) principles.

Before the breakout session began, we had a brief discussion about possible sites, space needed, and ballpark costs for the solar array. Rob mentioned two possible sites; an area on orchard road below the hospital and an area near a retention pond between Orchard road and Porter road. An estimate was given indicating that a 1.5 megawatt installation would need about four to five acres of space and would cost roughly .5 to .75 million dollars.

 

2015.03.07_022.jpgBreakout #1 - Group A  (Jeffrey Brownson)

Why doesn’t PSU just do the project?

  • As a land grant University, this project should work well on campus.
  • Make PSU be part of our community, help dissolve the barrier between PSU and the town. Help make PSU look like a non-threat.
  • Educational opportunity for PSU to inform the community about solar farming.
  • PSU land is open community shared land.
  • PSU has a large alumni pool, faculty-staff pool, and the area has a large resident pool.
  • Lifelong learning for the utilities industry.

 

 

2015.03.07_024.jpgBreakout #1 - Group B  (Susan Stewart)

Community – A public host would be better than a private host and would ba able to provide opportunities for outreach.

Co-Creators – There is a lot PSU can learn from this process.

Investors – Must be completed by 2016 in order to take advantage of tax benefits.

Users – Opportunity to integrate into education of students and visitors.

Earth Systems – Visual representation of good stewardship.

 

 

 

Breakout #1 - Group C  (Rob Cooper)

  • 2015.03.07_026.jpgPSU is a big purchaser but that means that our current cost for electricity is low.
  • This installation can be a good example for the next group that wants to build a solar array.
  • PSU can be an advocate to help push legal decisions within PA.
  • PSU can be a powerful ally in net metering legislation.
  • PSU can use this as a demonstration project.
  • PSU financial offices can learn from the CSOS project.
  • First pebble in the pond which may trickle down to other campuses.
  • PSU may be willing to accept the economic risk of a longer wait for return on investment in order to provide cultural and educational opportunities.
  • Problem s
    • PSU already has cheep power.
    • Is this real community integration?

Group Discussions Resulting from Breakout #1.

 

PSU is a massive asset for the Community Solar group.

Dave stated that he is concerned about the town & gown / PSU / student interrelationships.

We are here to help increase OPPs design space.

Wes asked how do we (and others) see the risk? How can we redefine the risk so it does not appear as ominous? What are the pre-costs and the post-costs of the project?

Does the warm fuzzy feeling of solar have a tangible effect on the economics involved?

Bean counters need to be a part of the team but they cannot drive the team.

 

What will the name be? Happy Valley Solar Cooperative (HVSC) We should consider using this as a placeholder for now. Solar may drop out as we move on to future projects.

Wes asked about addressing the 800 pound gorilla in the room. If PSU gets its feet wet in solar, can we help begin to push the Pennsylvania Utility Commission away from net metering?

Design RFP process for selecting the pilot project developer